Anant P. Godbole

General Information

I am a Professor of Mathematics in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Michigan Technological University.
I am also currently the Interim Associate Dean of the College of Sciences and Arts.

      

Address

College of Sciences and Arts
Michigan Technological University
1400 Townsend Drive
Houghton, Michigan 49931-1295
U.S.A.

Office Room: Walker, Room 201B
Telephone: (906) 487-2156

anant@mtu.edu

Courses I've taught in recent years

MA150-152,250  Calculus and Analytic Geometry I-IV
MA321  Probability
MA341  Introduction to Statistics with Calculus
MA406-407  Mathematical Statistics I-II
MA409  Graph Theory
MA450-452  Advanced Calculus I-III

Areas of research

My primary area of research is Probability Theory and Combinatorics. In this, I examine Discrete Random Structures, Random Graph Theory, Population Genetics, Poisson Approximation, Reliability Theory, Extremal Combinatorics, Probability Inequalities, Statistical Tests for Randomness, Interface between Math Research and Math Education.

Research Experiences for Undergraduates

Summer '98 will be the eighth year of operation of the REU program entitled "Discrete Random Structures". For more information, application forms, etc., please look at the REU site

Recent Publications

Random Sidon sequences, with Svante Janson, Nick Locantore and Rebecca Rapoport, to appear in Journal of Number Theory.

Threshold functions for the bipartite Turan property, Electronic Journal of Combinatorics, 1997, with Ben Lamorte and Erik Sandquist.

On the size of a random sphere of influence graph, with Tae Chalker, Pawel Hitczenko, Josh Radcliff and Otto Ruehr, to appear in Advances in Applied Probability.

Improved upper bounds for the reliability of d-dimensional consecutive k-out-of-n:F systems, with Laura Potter and Jessica Sklar, to appear in Naval Research Logistics.

Beyond the method of bounded differences, with Pawel Hitczenko, to appear in the Proceedings of the DIMACS/IAS Workshop on Discrete Probability, to be published by the American Mathematical Society.

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